The Ninoy Aquino Parks and Wildlife Center (NAPWC) is a 22.7-hectare protected area situated in the heart of Quezon City, envisioned to provide a world-class ecotourism destination and a venue for biodiversity conservation and education on Philippine endemic flora and fauna. As the only protected area in the National Capital Region, it is also an accessible and inexpensive get-away from the busyness of the metropolis and provides a breath of fresh air to all visitors.

As a protected area

  • Provides habitat to different flora and fauna, including:
    • 4,505 trees within the park, belonging to 135 species in 83 genera and 38 families
    • 58 of these tree species are indigenous, of which 7 are endemic including the Katmon, the Kamatog, and the Niyog-niyogan
    • Different species of animals, either in captivity or in the wild:
      • 73 species of birds, belonging to 36 families, including the Philippine eagle, Brahminy kite eagles, cockatoos, hornbills and egrets
      • 3 species of amphibians (frogs and turtles)
      • 11 species of reptiles, including crocodiles (saltwater and Mindoro/freshwater), pythons and monitor lizards
      • 5 species of mammals including monkeys, deer, squirrels and bats



  • Receives an estimated 500 to 800 visitors everyday; as much as 2,000 on weekends
  • Sprawling tree-filled landscape with picnic huts and tables, and a four-hectare manmade lagoon that provide excellent recreational spots; common site for film and TV productions
  • Open-air amphitheater overlooking the lagoon, providing a perfect setting for staging environmental shows and other programs
  • An 8,000-sq.m. mini-zoo called the Wildlife Rescue and Research Center, which provides temporary shelter for animals such as those turned in by the public or confiscated from illegal traders
  • A Visitor’s Center with air-conditioned function rooms; equipped with wi-fi connection; and has a functional library known as the Biodiversity and Climate Change Information Center



  • The park used to be part of the 197.8-hectare Quezon Memorial Park. It was later reduced to 64.58 hectares as portions were allocated for other government projects such as the Philippine Science High School and the National Government Center.
  • It was inaugurated and opened to the public on July 25, 1970 by then President Ferdinand Marcos and Vice-President Fernando Lopez.
  • It first underwent a major renovation in 1982 with the addition of several facilities and infrastructure including an amphitheater, fishing village, public restrooms, and water and lighting systems before it reopened in February 1983.
  • It was placed under the management of the DENR’s Protected Areas and Wildlife Bureau in 1987.
  • Its name has been changed four times: from the Lungsod ng Kabataan Recreational Park when it was reopened in1983; to the Ninoy Aquino Parks and Wildlife Nature Center in 1986; to the Wildlife Rescue and Rehabilitation Center in 2000 before it was renamed in 2002 to its present name, the Ninoy Aquino Parks and Wildlife Center.
  • In 2004, the park was finally established as a protected area and a component of the National Integrated Protected Area System (NIPAS) by then Pres. Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo through Proclamation No. 723.

The park is currently being redeveloped as a world-class eco-tourism site and learning center for biodiversity conservation, with the master plan conceived by renowned “green” urban planners Palafox and Associates.

About tuklasinnatin

A Journalist and served government for 20 years. A community organizer and rose from clan of artist and novelist.
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